<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=349935452247528&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
Search
word-map-thumb

The Alternative Board Blog

What Roles Do a Project Management Team Need to Succeed?

Dec. 5, 2012 | Posted by The Alternative Board
toolbox_bg-1
Thus far, we have created our Project Scope, and have created the project Success Criteria. The next step in the project process is to assemble the Project Team. Before selecting individuals, the first thing to do is to define the roles. For a typical small business project, the key roles are:

Project Manager:

The individual responsible for guiding the project team. The project manager is responsible for coordinating all project activities within the specified project parameters, (scope, budget, etc) and for meeting project success criteria.

Customer:

The ultimate recipient of the project. The customer determines the success criteria, and ultimately decides if the criteria has been met.

Analyst:

The analyst is the person responsible for understanding the problem or opportunity that the project is planning to address, and for defining the solution that will ultimately be achieved. The analyst must have a deep understanding of your business. Analysts also need to be good communicators, and exceptional writers.

Implementer:

This is a catch-all term for a project specific role.  For a software project, this will be the programmer(s). For a process improvement project, this will be the process engineer(s). The implementer will implement the bulk of the work needed to complete the project scope.

Quality Assurance:

Also known as testers. This is the person who will examine the work done by the implementer, and determine whether the project meets the project scope. A fundamental rule to follow, even for the smallest projects,  is always ensure that the quality assurance staff are distinct from the implementer(s).

Stakeholder:

The individual or group of people, internal or external to the organization, who are impacted by, or can impact, the outcomes of the project. Typically, individuals filling other roles on the project team are not considered stakeholders.

Trainer:

The person who will be responsible for training customers on the new solution. It's good practice to involve the trainer throughout the project; inclusion ensures that the trainer will be as knowledgeable as possible once they start training.

Vendor:

All external vendors involved in supplying technology or services for the project.
 
Don't be intimidated by this list of roles. In fact, this list of roles is quite small. For larger projects, there are many additional roles. For small businesses, an individual may play several of these roles.
 

Want additional insight? Read 4 Step Guide to Strategic Planning now to learn more

DOWNLOAD
For Project Tweet, the roles will be filled as follows:
 
McKenzie Rogers, owner of Hummingbird Deliveries, will play many roles. She will serve as project manager, stakeholder, and quality assurance. It's not ideal that the project manager and stakeholder roles are filled by a single person, since this has the feel of the fox guarding the hen house.  But for small companies, and for relatively simple projects, one person acting as project manager and stakeholder is fairly common.
 
The dispatcher will serve as the customer.  He will work with Rogers to specify the success criteria, and will ultimately determine whether these criteria have been met.
 
The other office employee will serve as the analyst and implementer. She will do all of the work activities required to complete this project.
 
On this project, there is no Trainer, and there are no external Vendors involved.
 
One final piece of advice in assembling the project team is to ensure that all team members have the capacity to do the project work. Over-extension is a common small business project mistake.  If all  of your team members already have a full plate, don't make the mistake of just adding the project to everyone's work load, and expecting that there will be no impact to their existing responsibilities. Something will need to give. Either operational tasks will get dropped, or the project will not be successful. Be sure to re-allocate tasks so that all project team members will be suitably dedicated to the project.

Read our 19 Reasons You Need a Business Owner Advisory Board

DOWNLOAD

Written by The Alternative Board

Related posts

Ways to Handle Supply Chain Shortages
May. 17, 2022 | Posted by The Alternative Board TAB
You don’t need a crystal ball to see that supply chain disruptions are likely to continue for some time to come. As we are all becoming painfully aware, supply chain disruption “is a major factor ...
How to Achieve Business Success by Knowing Your Strengths and Weaknesses
May. 10, 2022 | Posted by Phil Spensieri
Over my years as a business coach, I’ve heard hundreds of stories about how and why my clients got into business. Each story differs, but one thing remains common: every one of them got into business...
Inflation Busters: 15 PAINLESS ways to Reduce Your Business Expenses
May. 5, 2022 | Posted by Joe Zente, TAB Austin
Inflation Busters: 15 PAINLESS ways to Reduce Your Business Expenses April 20th, 2022 “Frugality drives innovation, just like other constraints.  One of the only ways to get out of a tight box is to...
Clamoring for Talent: 3 Ways To Improve Employee Retention
Apr. 29, 2022 | Posted by The Alternative Board
It is still a tough labor market out there. The Great Resignation and the dearth of eager job candidates are keeping business owners shorthanded and clamoring for new talent. In many cases, this...
1099 Contractor Versus W2 Employee: You Need To Know the Difference
Apr. 22, 2022 | Posted by The Alternative Board TAB
The current labor market is a challenging one. There are no two ways about it. Wages are up, talent is scarce, and small business owners are being forced to get creative with their labor acquisition...
The Importance of a Leadership Development Plan
Mar. 15, 2022 | Posted by Phil Spensieri
As a business owner have you ever given any thought as to who will replace one of your senior staff if they were to resign today? It’s a hard question, and the truth is no one really knows when...
Protecting Your Business in a Time of COVID
Feb. 4, 2022 | Posted by The Alternative Board
If anything demonstrates the role of uncertainty in today’s business landscape, it must be the nagging persistence of COVID-19 around the world. Only last year, it appeared the pandemic might be...
5 Ways To Manage A Remote Sales Team
Nov. 5, 2021 | Posted by The Alternative Board
Sales leaders have struggled with managing remote sales teams even before the pandemic. Today, with an increasing number of organizations moving partially or fully remote, the need to put practices...
Why Your Business Needs Standard Operating Procedures
Aug. 26, 2021 | Posted by The Alternative Board
Running a business is a costly, time-intensive process. Costs and time can grow exponentially if an organization lacks a system whereby products are made, or services rendered in a consistent manner....
6 Tips on Making a Family Business Partnership Work
Apr. 20, 2021 | Posted by The Alternative Board
We often hear stories about the difficulties of making a family business partnership successful. Yes, there are unique hurdles that differ from other types of business models, but with the right...