Business Concepts Archives - TAB Corporate

Must Haves for Impactful Business Event Planning

business event planning

Event planning may seem like a business-related activity that has little do with a CEO or business owner’s primary responsibilities. In fact, a high-profile business event can significantly affect the quality of a company’s brand recognition efforts—in itself, a top priority for any business leader. So it’s important that an event that represents your business be planned and executed with the right commitment to quality and value.

Events are an extension of a company’s broad-range marketing efforts and can exert considerable influence among existing and prospective customers. In order to achieve the most from your event planning efforts, keep these factors in mind:

Decide what your key objectives are. If the event features a new product launch, the overall goal is likely to be alerting the world at large about this dynamic new offering. If the event centers around customer appreciation, different goals around retention would be at the forefront. Whatever the theme, you should have a clear idea of the desired end-result as the planning process gets underway.

Highlight the experiential factor. Event program specialist Ben Hindman emphasizes the “experience” factor behind every successful event. This often starts with the right selection of venue, he says, adding that “if your venue doesn’t excite your guests, neither will your company or product.”

Other valuable roadshow event tips Hindman offers include:

  • Identify your “feeling” goal. Know what sentiment you want event participants to come away with. If the objective is to make your guests “feel like they’re part of something exclusive, then be diligent in making sure everything reflects that, from the invitation to the event photos.”
  • Go for emotion, not hard sell. A truly memorable event is one in which attendees make new connections and have a favorable emotional experience. Avoid blatant promotion of your product, which is “tacky and a huge turnoff” for most people. Instead, “design an event around the most relevant, interesting theme, idea or debate in your industry.”

Harness social media to get attendees excited in advance. Who have you invited to attend your event and/or plan to highlight as “guest speakers”? If these individuals have large and enthusiastic numbers of followers on social media, encourage them to post news and updates about the event well ahead of time. This helps build that all-important buzz which spreads awareness and excitement among event participants. Also, have your own event planners stay active on Twitter, Facebook and other social networks to boost awareness and keep your company brand top-of-mind among followers.

Position the CEO or business owner as a thought leader. If you have some speaking engagement experience, consider highlighting your company’s event as a guest speaker—with the goal of boosting your reputation as an industry thought leader. This means setting aside blatant self-promotion and/or internal sales quotas, focusing instead on offering insights into your industry that event attendees will profit from. In this way, your reputation will grow as a perceptive and generous thought leader—further enhancing your company’s brand in the process.

With the right focus and planning, your company can host an event that generates renewed interest and excitement in your brand. Yes, expenses are involved, but when dedicated to the right areas—venue, refreshments, compelling guest speakers—the experience will be one that people remember for a long time, and which they associate in a highly favorable way with your business overall.

Want to learn more about branding and event planning? Find out if a TAB Board is right for you!

 

Enhance Your Employee’s Productivity Through Office Design

Open Concept Home Office Space with Eclectic Furnishings in Mode

When was the last time you thought about changing the design of your workplace? If you feel there’s potential for greater productivity among your employees, take a close look at how your office or workspace is presently configured. This design might just be limiting employee engagement or participation in ways that affect everyone throughout the organization.

To enhance productivity and minimize employee burnout, keep these design options in mind:

Explore the open space option. It’s not right for every business, but many U.S. companies have adopted the open space concept for office design. Eliminating cubicles and private offices and replacing them with workstations in an open area often facilitates greater interaction and collaboration among employees—not to mention potential cost reductions in utilities, construction, office equipment, etc. This approach can be particularly beneficial for departments that rely on employee creativity to solve operational and/or marketing issues.

Look at alternative seating arrangements. There’s no inherent reason employees must be anchored to a traditional desk/chair seating arrangement. Many businesses are exploring the use of stand-up desks or so-called “walking desks,” that enable workers to stand in place or stroll about as part of their working day. For many of us, it’s far healthier to stand while working, rather than sit for hours in one place.

Focus on collaboration. Workplace designs that effectively promote collaboration can result in new perspectives for nagging customer-service problems and/or opportunities to brainstorm fresh ideas for product upgrades and other innovations.

“Creating paths for chance meetings, including nooks, and designing agile, unique workspaces are solutions that designers say promote collaboration, creativity, and productivity in the modern office,” notes Fast Company. When people gather to work on a problem—rather than trying to come up with solutions on their own—great things can happen.

Offer employees a choice about workplace design. Obviously, employees will express differing preferences for an ideal workplace environment. Within reason, look for opportunities to offer them choices about office set-ups—stand-up or reconfigurable desks, reliable ventilation, natural lighting, tweaks in office temperature, etc.—and emphasize the importance of making people comfortable while they work. Imposing mandatory workspace design changes is a less effective approach and can trigger negative feelings among employees.

Reduce the noise factor. Wherever people congregate, there’s bound to be more noise than usual. Again, some employees may thrive on that background hum, while for others it’s an intolerable distraction. Here are some factors to include in your “sound-friendly” strategies:

  • Look for office furniture, partitions and cabinets that incorporate noise reduction as part of their features.
  • Buy equipment (printers, copy machines, etc.) that operate at a low level of sound.
  • Install carpets or vinyl flooring—as opposed to ceramic or hardwood options—that minimize the sounds of footsteps (employees situated nearest established office pathways will thank you for this!).
  • Store office supplies in an area away from the workspace, so people aren’t distracted by others searching through supplies for the box of specialized paper clips they like.

Don’t forget the privacy factor. Even in an open, collaborative and high-functioning workspace, there’s still a need for privacy at times. Some design experts advise placing small nooks near social gathering areas, so people can step aside and communicate further on a particular topic, if they so desire. It’s also important for employees to have a private area to make conference or video calls. Small “private zones” should be an essential element of any comprehensive workspace redesign.

Want more advice on promoting employee productivity or general advice from other business owners like you? Find out if a TAB Board is right for you!