Recruitment Archives - TAB Corporate

How Technology Can Boost Your New Employee Recruitment Efforts

Gone are the days of job-seekers finding jobs in a newspaper’s classified section. Even online job boards aren’t as effective as they once were. To be competitive in today’s marketplace, businesses need to leverage more advanced technology to attract, recruit and hire the high-quality talent they so urgently need.

The two most important trends at work today are the explosion of mobile technology and the equally pervasive growth of social media. Companies wanting to reach out to younger job candidates should re-evaluate their current resources and see where improvements could make the difference between finding the right person for the job and missing a great hire.

Here are tips to boost your recruitment efforts:

Focus your efforts on mobile outreach and distribution. People are using their smartphones and tablets for an ever-widening range of activities, including the search for a new job. So, in crafting your job descriptions, be as succinct as possible and find wording that conveys excitement about the open position. Remember, people are viewing this content on a small (sometimes very small) screen, so don’t waste time on fluff and distracting graphics.

Make sure your website’s career pages are mobile-optimized. If you succeed in interesting an applicant, the effort will be wasted if they use their mobile device to access the career page on your company’s website and find only a jumble of words and images. Websites must be optimized for mobile users, so the experience of searching through job postings is seamless.

Explore the use of mobile recruitments apps. A variety of recruitment apps are available to aid companies in their candidate search. Undercover Recruiter profiles their “top five mobile job apps for sourcing candidates and making new connections.”

Look into automating recruitment-related activities. Of course, nothing can replace the human touch in your recruitment efforts. However, certain ongoing functions—posting on numerous job boards, keeping track of submitted resumes, managing the interview process, etc.—can be streamlined by the use of automated HR software and systems. Freeing up your HR person or team to focus on more strategic aspects of their job will improve the efficiency of your recruitment campaigns.

Get serious about social media. It’s likely you use social media to boost awareness of your brand and connect with current and prospective customers. But job-seekers also “live” on social media, and most of what they learn about your company comes from platforms like LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter.

With this in mind, look to customize at least some of your social media content to appeal to this demographic. Sharing updates and images from employee events and other activities helps convey a sense of your company culture—a key element in moving a candidate to further explore your job openings. The idea is to promote your workplace as an exciting and creative environment for its employees.

Tap into your own social networks. It’s essential to leverage the big social media platforms for communicating with prospective employees. But it can be equally effective to dig deeper into your own LinkedIn network (or other sites) and put the word out that you’re actively seeking job applicants.

In many cases, “people jump at the chance to help you because it means also helping a friend or contributing to their own networks,” notes Tech Target. “It’s a win-win-win strategy.”

With unemployment rates at a new low, the search for qualified talent is more intense than in recent memory. Exploring ways in which digital technology and social media can help focus your recruitment efforts may prove to be essential to success.

Want to learn more about using technology in the hiring process? Find out if a TAB Board is right for you!

 

 

Your Best Employee May Not Have Industry Experience

by Chuck Smith, President of NewHire

I remember when I joined my TAB board in 2003, one big question I had concerned how business owners from unrelated companies could be helpful to me in my business. I quickly learned that insights from outside my industry were often more helpful than those from inside.

In much the same way, employers overvalue “industry experience” when looking for talent to hire. Hiring managers tend to believe that candidates with industry experience will be able to hit the ground running or contribute from day 1. Managers also think that training time and cost will be reduced when hiring industry veterans.

To validate whether these ideas are true, I challenge you to a little thought experiment:

Think about your all-time-favorite employee.

Who is that person?

What would your life be like if your company was full of employees like that all-time-favorite?

It would be a good thing, right?

Now think about whether that all-time-favorite employee came to you with all the knowledge, skills and industry experience to be productive from the start. I’ve conducted this thought experiment with more than a 1,000 business owners.

The result: fewer than 1 in 25 say that their best employee came to them with industry experience.

Compromise While Hiring

Make the Hiring Process Easier
photo credit: Samuel Mann via photopin cc

Why do employers say they want candidates with industry experience?

I think the real reason is that it seems to make the hiring process easier. If the candidate already has done the things the manager needs done, it should be a no-brainer to hire the right person. But that is not always the case. Rather, employers often end up with bored, burned-out employees who have been doing the same thing in a different way inside a very different culture from yours.

I quickly learned that insights from outside my industry were often more helpful than those from inside.

Industry experience is just one of several categories that employers should use to measure whether a candidate is right for your and your company. Other important categories include work behaviors, motivations, skills and aptitude, and culture fit.

Where should you compromise in your hiring?

Of course if you can find a candidate who has all of the above, you’ve hit a home run. But should you have to compromise on any of those categories (and you almost always have to), I think “industry experience” is the one you should compromise first.

Often employers use “industry experience” as shorthand for things like:

  1. Product knowledge
  2. Contacts
  3. Technical ability

Let’s break those 3 things down:

  1. Could a person who demonstrates product knowledge in an industry different than yours and demonstrates an ability to learn new information learn the products in your industry?
  2. If a person has demonstrated the ability to develop industry contacts in one industry, could this be translatable to your industry?
  3. Is it possible that technical skills from a different industry, would be useful in your business?

It takes a bit more work and bit more imagination, but if you focus on demonstrated skills, behaviors, and abilities, you can open up your pool of candidates to those outside your industry to good effect.

Chuck is a sought-after speaker on issues of talent acquisition, recruiting and hiring best practices with more than 20 years of experience under his belt. When not running his business, you’ll find him in Hyde Park playing ultimate frisbee with his friends & family.

photo credit: Samuel Mann via photopin cc