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CEOs Save Time by Learning to Say “No”

Learn to Say No!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How many times in a day do people approach you or your gatekeeper with a request, suggestion or some other time-consuming appeal? Like many other business leaders, your first inclination may be to say, “OK,” or “Yes, I’ll look into that.” You want to help others or find ways to move a process along with your input.

But the reality is, by rarely or never saying, “No,” you waste a significant amount of your precious (and finite) time. When you “prioritize [another] person’s needs over your own,” says psychotherapist Jonathan Alpert, “you’ll find your productivity will suffer and resentment will mount.”

Saying “no” comes naturally to some, but if it’s an issue that continues to interrupt your daily work pattern—and negatively impacts your company’s efficiency—here are tips to get more comfortable with this answer.

Be polite, but firm. Rather than agreeing to a request, let the other person know what they’re asking for just isn’t possible at this (or, maybe, any other) time.

Don’t make excuses or give the impression you’ll get to it “soon.” Instead, politely but firmly say, “I’m sorry, but my schedule is full and I can’t assist you with this request.” If possible, direct them to someone else who may be able to help.

Provide context for your answer. People who ask for your assistance may think twice the next time if you provide a fuller explanation as to why “no” is now your default answer.

Business leader Kathy Bloomgarden advises CEOs to “take a step back and provide your rationale in the context of the company’s goals and priorities” as well as its relation to the market in general. “Leverage each discussion as an opportunity to strengthen the vision of where the whole team is going” and what’s needed to get there.

Say “no” to ideas that don’t fit your company’s strategic plan. People inside and beyond your company walls are likely bombarding you all the time with “great” ideas about how to improve business and acquire new customers.

Some ideas may be worth pursuing—in which case, the best response is to direct the person towards someone else in the company who’s better positioned to explore the idea further. At the same time, if you foresee that pursuing that idea might take time and resources your business can’t afford, it’s best to say no at the outset (with a brief explanation as to why). It all comes down to whether the next great idea genuinely fits within the parameters of where you see the business going in the coming months and years.

Be prepared to say “no” to a client. Of course, a client is the last person to whom you want to use “no” as an answer. But there may come a time when what they want from your company simply doesn’t fit with your existing resources or strategic objectives. Or they may ask for some sort of “exclusive arrangement” by which you can’t reach out to other prospective clients.

In such cases, it’s usually best to turn down the request in a forthright, respectful manner. Alternatively, notes financial adviser Andrew Schrage, you can “restate the problem” and “focus on the things you are able to do, rather than the ones you aren’t.” This way, it’s possible to say “no” to the client and yet retain their loyalty and gratitude.

Saying “no” doesn’t have to entail negative or unpleasant associations. It can pave the way towards greater efficiency (for the CEO) and motivation to take action on their own (on the part of senior executives and employees). It reinforces the idea that the CEO or business leader must prioritize their time in pursuit of strategic growth.

Want more great ideas on how to manage your time? Gain instant access to a video explaining “The 15 Golden Rules of Time Management.”

 

 

 

The Courage of “No”

When Doing the Hard Thing is Absolutely 100% the Right Thing

If you can’t say “no,” get intimate with failure.

If you can’t hear “no,” get used to stagnation or, worse yet, movement in the entirely wrong direction.

I am constantly struck by the lack of courage exhibited by those who feel they must always lip-serve an emphatic “Yes!” while everything in their innards is screaming the opposite. Equally disconcerting are those who refuse to receive anything negative or even neutral; instead they prefer a thumbs-up at any cost to be sent on their merry yet errant way.

Today’s most successful executives know the value of disagreeing with others.  At first blush, people often view disagreement as a major conflict or source of discomfort to be avoided.  I contest that view with the stance that you can’t afford to not disagree.

 Saying NO takes a healthy dose of courage.  Recognize and reward it.

Conversely, you can’t afford to constantly agree if you want to be a credible force in your profession.  If you wish to be taken seriously as an influencer in your field, why on earth would you tickle ears and egos with tons of “yes” when what everyone needs to hear is a tactful yet emphatic “no?”

Why is “no” so needed?

  • When all you hear is “Yes,” you have no way to prepare for hearing “No.”
  • You have no real idea of perspectives other than your own, and will suffer as a result (as will your business in any number of areas).
  • You have no way of avoiding ignorance on at least a few topics vital to your success, not just as a business owner, but also as a human being.
  • You have no way of hearing a healthy “no” above a din of toxic “yes” all around you.

Lorenz Lammens of Clear Goal Media posted a powerful graphic of Winston Churchill’s poignant quotes about why we can’t make it without criticism.  Even closer to the mark (of this post, at least) is a thought from businessman/author W. Clement Stone:

“Have the courage to say no.  Have the courage to face the truth.  Do the right thing because it is right.  These are the magic keys to living your life with integrity.”

Do you agree with this mentality – yes or no? (Take your time.)